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20130117
20130125
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KQED (PBS) 46
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we can do. >> president obama is proposing the most radical change to america's gun laws in two decades and putting them in- house coalition course. mr. obama said this is the time to act, but the gun lobby organization the nra dismissed the plan as an attack on firearms. mark has the story. >> the massacre of these 26 innocencts has changed the mood of the nation according to the president. youngsters urged him to change the law. he needs to bring the heart strings of his country to challenge gun culture. >> americans from every background can stand up and say we have suffered too much pain and care too much about our children to allow this to continue. in change will come. >> he signed a 23 orders, mostly small-scale, mainly tightening existing legislation. real change will need new laws, which many in congress will oppose. the new gun controls would mean a ban on semiautomatic assault weapons, a limit to the number of all with a magazine can hold, and i wrote checks for everyone buying a gun. >> are the president's kids more important than yours? >> the national rifle associa
it illegal in the state to enforce any new federal gun laws. how many times have we had this debate? this time after the murders of the children in newtown, conn., the president tells us this is different. the president has signed 23 executive orders aimed at reducing gun violence and is urging congress to reinstate a ban on so-called assault weapons, limit the size on magazines, and mandate here are some background checks for all gun sales. he is also asking the public to put heat on members of congress. >> remembers of congress if they support universal background checks to keep guns out of the wrong hands. the response from the nra was immediate. >> is the president's kids more important than yours? why is he's skeptical about putting our security in his school's, when his daughters have arm together school? mr. obama demands of will to pay their fair share of taxes but he is just another elitist hypocrite when it comes to his fair share of security. protection for his kids and gun- free zones for hours. -- for ours. >> at the white house, and jay carney called the ad cover the.
are here without their papers to somehow get right with the law. right now, i mean, if you commit an offense other than immigration, you can, you know, pay a penalty and move on with you life. not so with immigration. right now, for example, we have 2 million migrant farm workers about in the united states. 70% to 80% of them are here without their papers. we have 5,000 permanent residence visas for people without a college diploma. we have husbands and wives that are separated for half a decade. that's not acceptable. we need to reform the system for the economy and for american families. >> and what she told me is this is a real imperative. what's new, it also is now an imperative for republicans. the election results from last november made clear the republican party needs a message for latino, asian-americans and immigrant groups if they have any chance of recapturing the white house. >> scott, this is carla marinucci. what's your thoughts on this? we've seen paul ryan, marco rubio extend a hand to president obama so to speak and suggest they are ready to talk about immigratio
so on. now,-- now-- the line is let. legality. there is law. there is british law. there is american law. it's there, and it wasn't enforced in britain. >> rose: piers morgan for the hour next. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: piers morgan is here. he is the host of "piers morgan tonight." it is the two-year anniversary of the show's launch. he has interviewed, a colorfulivate of the guests. they range from paris hilton to the calledy llama. earlier in his career he headline the "sun" and "daily mirror. he is bringing his appetite for controversy to america. i am pleased to have him on this program. welcome. époood to see you. >> good to see you, charlie. >> rose: i want to just go to gun control because you waded into this battle. was there a particular thing that set you off, other than the tragedy of 20 innocent children? >> yeah. it was actually-- it was earlier than that. when i began at cnn in january 2010, it was a week after gabby giffords had been shot. and i was completely shock
in settlements in the west bank, settlements that are regarded as illegal under international law. they used to vote for his party and say nessun are to -- netanyahu has abandoned them. >> i do not think anyone ever had a thought that they wanted to say. we might have expected that was a reality thrust upon us, but i do not think anybody wanted it. >> i know that he will still be a leader. but i want to make sure that the coalition is a coalition that i believe in. >> benjamin netanyahu voted early today, confident he was unlikely to lose his job, but also knowing he might well have to govern a more right-wing coalition. throughout this campaign, benjamin netanyahu has portrayed himself as the only candidate with the strength and experience to tackle israel's many problems. rejecting criticism from home and overseas, he is taking israel down a dangerous confrontational path. mr. netanyahu has authorized even more building in the settlements. there has been no progress in the peace talks with palestinians. the prime minister could isolate israel even further. >> if they often form a governmen
in jewish settlements of occupied palestinian land, which is seen illegal by international law. but even that is not enough to appease some of his former supporters on the right. -- >> one report said that there was a record surge in settlement expansion, not enough for those on the right to say that he is not tough enough for the palestinians. >> israel has to be strong on their negotiations and by being weak -- this is detrimental. >> others worry that his decision to form an alliance with the older-nationalist lieberman could hurt israel overseas. >> israel is going to be under the brunt of increased international criticism and what is most dangerous is the criticism from europe and the united states, not from the people who don't particularly like us. >> benjamin netanyahu and barack obama have never been close, and the u.s. president is resigned to a difficult relationship with a more right-wing government in israel. -- >> an election watched very closely, even here on inauguration day, and prince harry is on his way home after another toward of duty in afghanistan. he has confessed
speaking-- urging them to listen to the american public and to the law enforcement community and support a ban on the further manufacture of military-style assault weapons. >> suarez: additionally, the obama plan calls for congress to order background checks for all gun sales, ending the so-called "gun show loophole." and it seeks stiffer penalties for people who sell guns to criminals. all told, the plan would cost some $500 million. and president obama said, "it's going to take some heavy political lifting." >> this will be difficult. there will be pundits and politicians and politicians and special interest lobbyists publicly warning of a tyrannical all-out assault on liberty, not because that's true but because they want to gin up fear or higher ratings or revenue for themselves. and behind the scenes they'll do everything they can to block any common-sense reform and make sure nothing changes whatsoever. >> suarez: even before the president spoke, david keene, head of the national rifle association, dismissed the plan, in an interview with judy woodruff last night on "the newshour."
department about american options? >> well, american options are limited by american law right now. because u.s. law pro ibt hads assisting a government or a military that came to power through a coup. and right now the malian government that we are trying to support in their efforts to control the rebels and to control the al qaeda and islamic militants in mali came to power through coup. so we can't provide them direct assistance. so u.s. law prohibits that. we're finding work arounds what that mean as secretary clinton laid out today is that by this weekend there will be military trainers in the area to train african militaries to go into mali, we'll be paying for that. we will be helping to fund the airlift to bring in a french battalion. there will be about 600 troops coming in with tanks to mali. so there are work arounds but there are restrictions that prevent the u.s. military from getting directly involved in mali. >> what can we do to support the french? >> the french have asked the united states for a number of things. the mallian government has also asked the united states for a n
anders, senior legislative council at the american civil liberties union. the a.c.l.u. has filed law-suits against the government challenging the legal basis for the drone program. welcome to both of you. i want to start, seth, with the effectiveness question. how effective are drones strikes? >> i think on the one hand, drones have been effective in taking off the battle field several individuals that have been actively involved in plotting attacks against the u.s. homeland. all of them plotting active attacks and the drone strikes severely disrupted those attacks. i would also say, though, that they are not sufficient. strikes in and of themselves don't hold territory. they don't deal with the root causes of terrorism. so one should never argue-- or it would be incorrect to argue that they are sufficient to ending how terrorist dwriewps operate orinding terrorism. >> brown: do you dispute the effectiveness in taking out some of the top leaders? >> the truth is that no one really knows exactly what's going on with their effectiveness or not because this is a program that has been wr
an assault weapons ban become law again were easy, it would never have expired. if the variety of other actions that the president proposes we take as a nation were without conflict, we wouldn't be having this discussion. >> suarez: that call for a new, stricter prohibition against military assault-style weapons is already being rejected by house republicans. it's also gotten a mixed response even among senate democrats, not to mention the gun lobby. >> most of the proposals that have to do with firearms are simply feel good proposals that have been tried in the past and won't work or won't have any real impact. >> suarez: on "cbs this morning," the national rifle association president david keene did say the group might support universal background checks, if they could be made to work. >> the difficulty comes in when you're talking about you and me as next door neighbors and you buy a new shotgun and want to sell one to me. how do you enforce a background check on that? we want to see the proposal but as a general proposition, the n.r.a. has been very supportive of doing background ch
for the public to be diligent, and if there is something suspicious, we'd like for them to report it to law enforcement. >> suarez: the idea is to replicate 2009-- there were no arrests, despite a crowd of some two million people, officials u®4w just a few years ago, when her ñrçóÑiÑiÑii ay takes on a special meaning. >> i think the hugest thing is +r d+ake by, render a salute, and that's huge evenor myself.çó you know, i may get a glimpse of him, so that's a big deal! >> suarez: and so will millions of others, in person and on televisions, computers and mobile devices across the world. >> he'll walk down the hall, and then he'll go outside, and when he opens those doors, he'll see hundreds of thousands of people cheering at him. it will be a sight that is awesome. : producing awe. >> brown: and now to the man who will be just the fifth inaugural poet in the nation's history. richard blanco was, as he says, "made in cuba"-- he was conceived there; "assembled in spain"-- his mother gave birth to him there; and quickly "imported to the united states"-- he grew up in miami. he trained
years, it's time to write about hit in the books of law. the job of the president-- and obama has done this magnificently-- is to make america feel its greatness, its ideals to arouse our idealism. it's also the job of a president to write it in the books of law, to get actual legislation passed. that's what a nation is governed by and the second term in my mind is going to hinge on what is written in the books of law. >> rose: two things, one is that there's no question that l.b.j. is the most formidable political human figure i've ever met and if we had only known that person that bob caro knows through his research that i was lucky enough to know when i was 24 years old i think the country would have been felt differently there was one moment that he spoke to a bunch of reporters and he was himself and he never did that again. the teleprompter was a girdle on him. to go back to what bob woodward said, we can't forget that the republicans have attacked the democrats and obama even more fiercely than he's attacked them so it's not like he's out there saying these mean things about the
. >> smith: were you ever contacted by anybody in law enforcement or the justice department? >> not until just recently. >> we are going to step up on the principle of one set of rules for everyone, equal justice under law. >> narrator: finally, in late 2012, the state of new york sued a wall street bank for fraudulently misrepresenting the mortgages they packaged and sold. >> very simply, we're investigating the misconduct of folks who caused the bubble... >> narrator: the man who brought the suit was new york attorney general eric schneiderman, co-chair of a new state-federal working group that included the department of justice, the sec and others. >> ...complaint for securities fraud against jpmorgan chase as successors to bear stearns and company and emc mortgage corporation. >> narrator: although the case centered on bankers' fraudulent and deceptive practices, no individuals were named. the suit was a civil, not criminal, case. >> smith: and you've alleged in the case of bear stearns that they passed these things on knowingly, intentionally, knowing they were bad? >> yes. we think
the overthrow of moammar qaddafi, libya's strong man. aqim has established strict islamist law in northern mali and destroyed dozens of aish went movings -- ancient mosques and tombs. the united nations has declared it a culture heritage site. the french president asked the u.s. to help france's military in using manpower and drones. >> question, what's at stake for the u.s. in mali? >> clearly, we and the rest of the world don't really want the al qaeda affiliate to establish its roots there. the government is weak. it's not a democratic government. and so defense secretary leon panetta has said that the u.s. government is willing to assist the french with logistics and intelligence. the drones you mentioned are not -- they would not be armed drones. they would be intelligence gathering drones but the french have taken the lead on n. i think so far the u.s. is standing on the side lienls pretty much -- sidelines pretty much cheering them on because it's an important mission. >> we've sent 55,000 americans there according to-- >> 50 million? >> what is it? 550 americans and they are there not a
. well, thanks to moore's law, which is the law that drives everything in technology about making every 18 months becomes twice as powerful and half as expensive -- >> rose: the processing in computers and everything else. >> everything becomes cheaper over time. like if you made an automobile it would only cost ten cents today. but the notion is that now we've gone -- we've put the means production in the hands of the consumers and that means that they literally no longer need media companies or big companies. if they have something to say or something they want to create and it basically says people like you who have an audience, who have a brand, no matter how large or small can reach that brand in a way you never could before. you don't need someone else's permission. you don't need to observe the seven words no one can say on television. you can have whatever programming you wish. this is likely, i think, to result in some really important improvements in daily life for all of us. i think it will be transformational in education because essentially this notion that we're going to d
brothers and sisters treated like anyone else under the law. for if we are truly created equal, then surely the love we commit to one another must be equal as well. >> i now pronounce you married. fill: the president first announced his support of same sex marriage last may. but that reference for a first for a presidential inaugural speech. he also raised immigration reform. an issue that went unaddressed for much of his first term. >> our journey is not complete until we find a better way to welcome the hopeful immigrants who still see america as a land of opportunity. until bright, young students and engineers are lifted in our work force rather than expelled from our country >> ifill: the president singled out climate change as well, another issue that remains largely on the back burner during his first four years in the white house. >> we will respond to the threat of climate change. knowing that the failure to do so would betray our children and future generations. ( applause ) some may still deny the overwhelming judgment of science, but none can avoid the devastating impact of ragin
from the french fighting to what is going on in algeria. we have had many laws of unintended consequences and the middle east. think of the effort to get the soviets out of afghanistan and what it led to. this is a characteristic of the region, not a characteristic of bad politics. it was good to get rid of gaddafi and the soviets. from the pakistan border to the atlantic ocean, you will have something like this, get ready for it and deal with it. >> are they the same ideologically as al qaeda in iraq? >> there are experts that can talk about that. by and large what they represent is extreme for the political islamic theological movements including using violence with anybody that disagree with them. that is what is in common for all of these organizations. calling them al qaeda is loose association. a few years earlier, they invited the city terrorists in iraq to join them as well. so you get these offshoots that are only loosely connected organizations. but they do have a similar theological and political agenda. >> how much of a threat do they represent to americans here?
. outside the court today, his brother-in-law said in his body was proof of murder. >> we some marks on the left and right shoulder, he said. there was a cut on the forearm, and there were marks on his back. it seems he was trying to flee. we believe he was killed. >> the family is looking to the supreme court for answers and for justice. the government has already established a judicial commission to look into his death. a report is due in about 10 days or so. many here wonder if whenever it may be will actually come out. so the supreme court has now ordered its own investigation into the death of the official, saying there were widespread concerns that the inquiry would not be free and fair. bbc news, islamabad. >> now, to london, where the british prime minister, david cameron, talks about a choice about whether to leave the european union if his party wins the next election. it will be the first time in nearly 40 years for the british people to say whether they want to be in the eu or out. some were quick to criticize the move, saying it could block future risk. our correspondent
will be a cirrus law on her record? >> i think it is a flaw. but i don't think it will be a lasting flaw. it was a systemic breakdown. there was an independent review that established there was a lot of culpability of a lot of people on the sixth floor of the state department, but she was on the seventh floor, and certainly, her posture has been she accepts responsibility for what happened but not blame, and that's pret much what played out today in two hearings. she was uncharacteristically emotional in describing the death of the four americans. so i don't think it's going to be an impediment to what everybody assumes are her longer term political ambitions to run for the presidency. >> rose: what struck you about the testimony today that was noteworthy? >> well, there was very little that shed new light on the white house role. you know, there was an independent review conducted of what the-- how the state department handled it because it's required by statute. there's no such statute for how the n.s.c. handled it. it would be interesting if there was. i don't think woe learned a lot
these laws based on the world you live in. why don't you come into the world that we live in? gwen: peter, you wrote about it. our language is so influenced with gun references that we can't get around it. you take aim at something or you take a shot at somebody tfment vice president has even used it it. >> oh, the vice president says i'm shooting for tuesday. >> and there's no silver bullet. >> i do it. i don't pretend that we don't. we all kind of find ourselves -- use the vernacular of guns because it's part of our culture. it's part of our public mythology. that describes a little bit of what you're talking about there's a vast part of the country between the coast that identify with a way of life whether it's factual or not and some people would argue that or not is something that flavors the debate. >> and i think the president was trying by having thatent when he announced those proposals written in the wake of newtown that what the president's trying to do with the white house is change think from a debate about elites tell us what to do ant our god-given rights into a conversatio
god mend thine every know flaw by liberty and law. that's not the verse i'll sing but that's a good one. >> rose: what's the verse you'll sing. >> you knew, god shed his grace on thee and crown thy good with brotherhood from sea to shining sea. that's nice. i mean it's great and a lovely song. you know you just get into the song you get into the arrangement and singing it ask it is a lovely patriotic tune. and you know, america is such a noble experiment. it's really the light of the world. a lot of people are angry with us but mainly because of our sort of corporate colonialism that we practice. that's not the american people. those are individuals who are acting badly, you know. not standing alone and union carbide nepal -- that's a real problem for the future aside from carbon in the atmosphere, you know, what we do with corporate organization and corporate power and how we make it serve human beings and the largest number of human beings at that, and not just enslave human beings and you know march backwards. that's a big, that's a big knot for human beings to deal with, this q
the law for if we are truly created equal, then surely the love we commit to one another must be equal as well. our journey is not complete until no citizen is forced to wait for hours to exercise the right to vote. our journey is not complete until we find a better way to welcome the striving, hopeful immigrants who still see america as a land of opportunity, until bright, young students and engineers are listed in our work force rather than expelled from our country. our journey is not complete until all our children from the streets of detroit to the hills of appalachia to the quiet lanes of newtown know that they are cared for and cherished and always safe from harm. that is our generation's task: to make these works, these rights, these values of life and liberty and the pursuit of happiness real for every american >> brown: the broad theme for this inaugural was faith in america's future. the president closed his remarks by looking forward to the expected political battles. he urged both parties to work together for the good of the country but also called for citizens to hold the
for the 11 million people who are here without their papers to somehow get right with the law. >> what's next for the debate in congress? as the debt ceiling hovers over head? >>> plus governor jerry brown up close and personal. in an exclusive interview with pbs "newshour's" spencer michels. >> it drives me crazy when people say, you haven't done anything. should we cut the colleges more and pump it into the prisons? >> our spotlight on politics coming up next.
investors may have caught up to apple's stunning growth, but perhaps the law of large numbers, i think growth is getting increasingly harder to achieve. i think the easy growth has already happened in the iphone in developed markets like the u.s. the next wave of growth will come from emerging markets, from china and lower-priced phones. so apple may have a harder time getting that sort of growth. >> tom: i think 61% of its business last quarter was done internationally. showing how important the international shares are. what about comply constraints that apple may have experienced. there was lots of talk about that with the apple iphone 5. are those restraints continuing. >> it looks like it weighed on the december quarter, the iphone 4 and there was a lot of demand for the cheaper version. it seemed like on a lot of different levels, iphone wasn't able to execute. and that was surprising, given tim cook's strengths. that is not an area we think is weak. after steven job's paving. >> tom: and is that what we heard, the late forecast, being a little shy of what we expected. >> i think
his family moved, he encountered racism head on. he went to law school and became an advocate for tenants rights in boston where he began to scratch poems on legal pads while waiting in court houses for cases to be called. you can't read any of his 16 books of poems and essay, and most recently, the trouble ball, without understanding a man who is a struggling writer, whose past is a living, breathing news whispering over his shoulder as he scribbles the names of ancestors who once pulled the oars over troubled waters. it was in the wake of president barack obama's victory that brought him here, to the former slave frederick douglas skpchlt with it, a poem. >> rochester, new york, november 7, 2008. this is the long titude and latitude of the impossible. this is the epicenter of the unthinkable. this is the crossroads of the unimaginable, the tomb of frederick douglas three days after the election. this is a world spinning away from the gravity of centuries where the grave of a fugitive slave has become an altar. this is a tomb of a man born as chattel who taught himself to rea
to the front lines by law in a compulsory manner to serve as a infantry woman? >> ifill: you have a few seconds to answer? >> i don't know how this is going to effect the selective service but i do think that with full rights comes full responsibilities. >> ifill: colonel ellen haring and wade zirkle founder of vets for freedom, thank you very much. >> brown: next, trying to make sense of china's economy. a top chinese official told leaders at the davos world economic forum in switzerland this week the country is expecting faster growth this year. if anything, he said, china's trying to stop the economy from overheating too quickly. but some are asking whether china's high-flying growth may be built on questionable assumptions. "newshour" economics correspondent paul solman has our look as, yes, part of his ongoing reporting: "making sense of financial news." >> reporter: china: the juggernaut that's driving a world economic recovery? or a classic bubble about to burst, taking us all down with it? the evidence is dramatic, on both sides. on the one hand, breakneck urbanization-- building ten ne
Search Results 0 to 45 of about 46 (some duplicates have been removed)